Exhibit News

Particles on the Wall is excited to announce upcoming exhibits!

 

The REACH Museum

June 29 - October 21, 2016.

The REACH Museum
1943 Columbia Park Trail
Richland, WA 99352
Sun & Mon: Closed
Tue - Sat: 10:00AM-4:30PM

Visitthereach.org

REACH POTW Flyer.jpg

 

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In keeping with our desire to share our efforts to foster a more peaceful, healthy, and sustainable world, we offer POTW for free as an e-book or PDF file.

Particles on the Wall 2nd edition from Healthy World Press

 


Nancy Dickeman

poetry, history, memorabilia

nancydickeman@gmail.com


Nancy Dickeman is a co-founder and literary curator for Particles on the Wall and a peace and nuclear disarmament activist. Nancy's poems and essays have appeared in Poetry Northwest, The Seattle Review, The Seattle PI, OCEAN Magazine, Common Dreams and other publications. She received a Commendation Award from the National Poetry Competition and was a co-winner of River City's Hohenberg Award. She received first place in the Hanford Haiku Challenge by Hanford Challenge. Nancy received her MA in Creative Writing at the University of Washington where she won an Academy of American Poets Award. Her poetry manuscript is titled In the Lightning's Blue Arc. She has recently completed her first novel manuscript, Green Run, White Train, set in her hometown of Richland, Washington.

Nancy and her sister, Dianne Dickeman, co-created the installation, The Use of All Necessary Means, which was exhibited at the 911 Media Arts Center in Seattle. The installation combined visual images, text and found objects in exploring the first Gulf War and the use of force as a means to an end. For her work in environmental health with Washington Physicians for Social Responsibility, Nancy received The Toxics Prevention Leadership Award from the Washington Toxics Coalition. She serves on the planning committee for From Hiroshima to Hope, and on the Board of the Abe Keller Peace Education Fund.

Nancy grew up in Richland where her father was a nuclear physicist at the Hanford Nuclear Reservation. She and her family lived in a government-built alphabet 'K' house, spent summer afternoons swimming in the lagoon, and many evenings playing on the banks of the Columbia River. She now lives in Seattle.

 



Dianne Dickeman

visual arts, history, memorabilia

djdickeman@hotmail.com


 

Dianne Dickeman, one of the co-founders and the visual art curator for Particles on the Wall, is a painter who lives in Seattle. She received a BFA in Painting from the University of Washington, and is an alumnus of the Skowhegan School of Painting and Sculpture in Skowhegan, Maine. She has also studied at the Pilchuck Glass School, and held a Printmaking residency at the Centrum Foundation.  Dianne has exhibited in numerous venues in Seattle and the Northwest, including the Wright Exhibition Space, Tacoma Art Museum, Kirkland Art Center, Center on Contemporary Art, Ag47 Gallery, the Bellevue Arts Museum, and the Whatcom Museum. 

 

She is also an arts professional and cultural worker, with a 25 year history at Artech Fine Art Services in capacities ranging from Operations Manager to Storage Manager and Registrar. She is a member of the Alliance of American Museums, the Washington Museum Association, the Henry Art Gallery and the Seattle Art Museum.

 

Dianne and her sister, Nancy Dickeman, also teamed up some years ago to co-create an installation at the 911 Media Arts Center in Seattle. The Use of All Necessary Means was a multidisciplinary installation in storefront windows which reflected on the first Gulf War and the use of violence as a means to an end. 

 

Dianne was born and raised in Richland, graduating from Columbia High School, home of the Bombers.  Her father was a nuclear physicist who came to work at the Hanford Nuclear Reservation in  late 1948, and in the early 1960’s managed the N Reactor project, the first dual purpose reactor.  She has vivid memories of life in the small town community, but especially the shrub steppe landscape, the Columbia River, the magnificent sky, and the wind.


 


 

Steven Gilbert

science and history 

sgilbert@innd.org

 

Steven G. Gilbert, Ph.D., D.A.B.T., Director and founder of the Institute of Neurotoxicology and Neurological Disorders (INND), received a Ph.D. in Toxicology in 1986 from the University of Rochester, Rochester, NY, and is a Diplomat of American Board of Toxicology. He is an Affiliate Professor in the Department of Environmental and Occupational Health Sciences, University of Washington and Affiliate Professor, Interdisciplinary Arts & Sciences, UW Bothell.

In 2004 he published A Small Dose of Toxicology: The Health Effects of Common Chemicals (CRC Press). More information is available on his web site A Small Dose of Toxicology. He expands on this work with www.toxipedia.orga wiki-based website with the mission of connecting people and science. 

Dr. Gilbert's dedication to science education, advocacy for better human and environmental health policy and his love for the arts led to his involvement with Particles on the Wall. In 2010, he along with Nancy and Diane Dickeman, helped found Particles on the Wall, and continues to develop the exhibit through curating science and history. 

Dr. Gilbert also consults and lectures on issues related to toxicology, drug development and bioethics. He is available for speaking engagements on toxicology, stem cells, drug development, and bioethics. He is particularly interested in making toxicology and biomedical research accessible to the public and policy makers.

To learn more about Steve, take a look at his curriculum vitaea one page biosketchHe can be contacted at sgilbert@innd.org.

 


 

Bill Witherup (1935-2009)

One of the original founders

Bill Witherup, who sometimes publishes as William Witherup, is the author of some nine books of poetry. The most recent publications are Men at Work (1990) and Down Wind, Down River: New and Selected Poems (2000). His most recent anthology appearance is in American Working-Class Literature: An Anthology, edited by Nicolas Coles and Janet Zandy (Oxford 2006).