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Nitrobenzene

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Just the facts


Physical Information

Name: Nitrobenzene

CAS No: 98-95-3

Trade Names: Caswell No. 600

Use: industrial chemical intermediary

Overview


Nitrobenzene is an widely used industrial chemical used primarily to manufacture the chemical aniline (#ATSDR ToxFAQs). It is a neurotoxicant and thought to be a likely Carcinogens.

 

Chemical Description


Specifics

Melting Point: 5.7 degrees C

Boiling Point: 210.8 degrees C

Color: Yellow

Odor: bitter almonds, show polish

Molecular Weight: 123.11

At room temperature, the chemical is a yellow viscous liquid

Uses


The vast majority (97.5%) of nitrobenzene in use is used in the captive production of Aniline which, in turn, is used in the production of polyuerethanes. It is also used as a solvent in petroleum refining, producing acetate, as a perfume for soaps, a solvent in show dyes, and in the synthesis of Acetaminophen (#ATSDR Toxicological Profile).

Health Effects


Nitrobenzene is a mild irritant of the skin and eyes if they come into contact with the chemical. Chronic exposure to nitrobenzene can lead to methemoglobinemia, a condition which affects the blood's ability to carry oxygen. This condition can lead the skin to turn a bluish color and also lead to nausea, vomiting, and shortness of breath (#ATSDR ToxFAQs). Liver damage may also be a byproduct of breathing in large quantities of nitrobenzene.
Nitrobenzene is now thought to be a likely Carcinogens (#US Department of HHS).

External Links and References


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