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Nematocyst Venom

Just the facts

 

Physical Information

Name: Nematocyst Venom

Use: none

Source: Jellyfish, Anemona, Coral

Recommended daily intake: none (not essential)

Absorption: skin

Sensitive individuals: children, elderly

Toxicity/symptoms: sting, muscle cramps

Regulatory facts: none

General facts:

Environmental:

Recommendations: Stay away from toxin emitting specimens

 

Pharmacology and Metabolism


Nematocyst venom contains proteins that destroy the genetic and metabolic portions of a cell as well as the energy molecules and parts of the cellular membrane. The venom seriously degrades all human body tissue it contacts. Because the venom's chemical composition and its hemolytic component, the toxin has the ability to affect cells in multiple areas of the victim's body.

Also, with nematocyst venom, there is a small variance between a lethal and non-lethal dose. Therefore, the venom is only fatal at high concentrations.

Health Effects


Because the venom is used to kill smaller prey, humans do not usually die from the sting but rather from drowning due to shock from the extreme pain after coming into contact with the toxin. However, it is possible to die from the toxin since some specimens can discharge semi-autonomously (such as the Portuguese Man-O-War).

References


http://www.bio.davidson.edu/people/midorcas/animalphysiology/websites/2006/brhenschen/Toxicology1.html

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